Table of Contents 

  1. Personal Protective Equipment (PPE)
  1. Hazardous Chemicals
  1. Confined Spaces
  1. Heavy Machinery
  1. Emergency Response
  1. Heat Stress Prevention

      7. Electrical Safety

  1. Ergonomics
  1. First Aid and CPR Training
  1. Regular Safety Inspections and Audits
  1. Personal Protective Equipment (PPE)

The use of Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) is critical in ensuring employee safety in the brewery. Proper PPE such as gloves, safety glasses, and protective clothing can help prevent injuries from hot liquids and gases, chemicals, and sharp objects.

Brewery employees should be trained on how to use PPE correctly, and it should be readily available and in good condition.

  1. Hazardous Chemicals

Breweries use a variety of chemicals in the brewing process, such as cleaning agents, sanitizers, and disinfectants. These chemicals can be hazardous if not handled properly.

Breweries should have a written Hazard Communication Program (HazCom) that outlines the safe handling and use of hazardous chemicals. This program should include information on the proper use of PPE, how to handle and store chemicals, and how to respond to a spill or other emergency.

  1. Confined Spaces

Breweries often have confined spaces such as tanks, vats, and silos. These spaces can be hazardous due to the lack of ventilation, limited access, and the potential for hazardous gases to build up.

Employees should be trained on the hazards associated with confined spaces and how to enter and exit them safely. Employers should also have a written Confined Space Entry Program that outlines the procedures for entering and working in confined spaces.

  1. Heavy Machinery

Breweries use a variety of heavy machinery such as mills, augers, and bottling lines. This machinery can be hazardous if not used correctly.

Employees should be trained on how to use the machinery safely, and the machinery should be regularly inspected and maintained. Employers should also have procedures in place for locking out the machinery during maintenance or repairs.

  1. Emergency Response

Breweries should have a written Emergency Response Plan that outlines the procedures for responding to emergencies such as fires, spills, and injuries.

Employees should be trained on the Emergency Response Plan, and regular drills should be conducted to ensure that employees know what to do in an emergency.

  1. Heat Stress Prevention

Working in a brewery can be hot and humid, especially during the brewing process. Heat stress can lead to dehydration, heat exhaustion, and heat stroke, which can be life-threatening.

  1. Electrical Safety

Breweries use a lot of electrical equipment, from pumps and motors to lighting and heating. Electrical hazards can include electrical shock, burns, and fire.

To ensure electrical safety, employers should have a written Electrical Safety Program that outlines the safe use of electrical equipment, how to identify electrical hazards, and how to respond to an electrical emergency. Electrical equipment should be regularly inspected and maintained, and employees should be trained on how to use it safely.

  1. Ergonomics

Brewery workers often perform repetitive tasks, such as lifting heavy bags of grain or standing for long periods. These tasks can lead to musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) such as back pain, carpal tunnel syndrome, and tendonitis.

Employers should implement ergonomic practices, such as using proper lifting techniques, providing adjustable workstations, and rotating tasks to reduce the risk of MSDs.

  1. First Aid and CPR Training

Injuries can happen in any workplace, including breweries. It’s important for employers to have employees trained in first aid and CPR to respond to injuries or medical emergencies.

Employers should provide first aid and CPR training to employees and ensure that first aid kits and AEDs (Automated External Defibrillators) are readily available in the workplace.

  1. Regular Safety Inspections and Audits

Regular safety inspections and audits can help identify potential hazards and ensure that safety protocols are being followed.

Employers should conduct regular safety inspections and audits, and employees should be encouraged to report any safety concerns or hazards they observe.

In summary, implementing these additional best practices for brewery safety can further reduce the risk of workplace hazards and promote a safe working environment for all brewery employees.

In conclusion, breweries can be hazardous places to work, but by implementing proper safety protocols, employers can ensure a safe workplace for their employees. Personal Protective Equipment, Hazard Communication Programs, Confined Space Entry Programs, regular machinery inspections and maintenance, and Emergency Response Plans are just a few of the best practices that breweries can implement to ensure a safe workplace.

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